The Charity Of Corporations Isn’t As Awesome As It Looks

They parlay their pocket change into sainthood.

Emily Rose
10 min readAug 10, 2022

--

I know more than one person who argues in favor of ultra-wealthy CEOs on the premise that they donate literal billions of dollars to charity. $24.8 billions, in fact, in 2020. And that’s a good, right? We should be happy and grateful for those billions, right? Who else in this economy could be so charitable, if not the billionaires?

To which I’ll try insisting that most Americans would be more charitable if they, too, turned a profit each year but can’t because money hoarding by the rich is directly contributing to inflation and stagnated wages. Usually, this just prompts these people to demand I cite my sources from memory, even though they won’t cite any for their own argument. All of a sudden, they can’t think of any but their own ideas on how the world ought to work…

So I found and cited some sources, but first I thought I’d expound on a little story I’ve seen around the internet. You know, to set the mood.

There once was a rich man who went to Walmart. As he approached the entrance, he found a wad of cash on the ground. Wow! It was a whole $200!

He was already planning what he was going to buy for himself with this windfall, but as he stepped inside the Walmart he noticed a young woman with a toddler in her cart. She was standing outside the little in-store bank, sobbing abysmally, so the man stopped to ask her what was wrong.

“I was going to deposit my $200 to pay my light bill and buy diapers, but it must have fallen out of my pocket! I can’t find it anywhere! My partner will beat me if the lights are shut off again, and I don’t know what to do!”

Moved by the woman’s story, the man gave her $100 of the $200 he had just found. Because when the Lord blesses you, you must bless others.

--

--

Emily Rose

Just sitting here, making waves… #ramblingrose